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Windows fitted with Actuators versus Smoke Control ventilators...

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... a no-brainer for life safety products

As a manufacturer of smoke control ventilators we bear the responsibility for life saving products. A life saving product that should help people to escape in the event of fire or to protect firefighters as they enter the building to tackle the fire.

To fulfill this responsibility we should be 100% sure that these smoke control ventilators operate in case of fire, regardless whether these are topped with snow or exposed to heavy winds. The functioning of the smoke control system should be guaranteed under all conditions.

The only way to ensure this, is by testing the smoke control ventilators extensively and producing the units in accordance with the product specifications described in the test reports.

Which tests differentiate smoke control ventilators from actuated windows? There are 4 compelling reasons why only smoke control ventilators should be used for fire safety.

Smoke control ventilators should be tested as one assembly for secured performance under low temperatures, wind exposure and high snow loads

Such ventilators are tested as one assembly to withstand pre-determined wind loads. Furthermore have these units been tested extensively to operate without problems under low temperatures and being topped with heavy loads of snow.

Snow load test

Smoke extraction performance under wind conditions

The design, manufacture and testing of smoke ventilators is covered by the Construction Products Regulation and ventilators should be CE marked to EN 12101-2. Both window and actuator manufacturers are not able to claim that their products in isolation meet the requirements of the EN 12101-2 standard. For aerodynamic performance the products need to be tested in wind tunnels for every single wind angle and for every single build in angle, in order to be sure that enough negative wind pressure is created over the ventilators to create the required extraction capacity.

Aerodynamic test

Designed and tested for dual purpose

Smoke control ventilators have been designed for dual purpose application, for as well smoke as natural ventilation. EN 12101-2 requires them to be to tested to 1,000 cycles for smoke and a minimum of 10,000 cycles for day-to-day ventilation. Just to be sure that these ventilators don‘t fail at the moment that you need them most, in case of fire.

Dual purpose test

Tested for performance under high temperature exposure

During a fire ventilators will be exposed to high temperatures. Therefore smoke control ventilators are to be tested for performance while exposed to a temperature of 300 degrees Celsius during 30 minutes.

Fire test

Could you bear the responsibility of specifying or applying actuated windows without having the guarantee that these two ‘off the shelf‘ components are compatible and have been tested as one assembly, bearing in mind that in most cases these components have been supplied by two different parties? Or should we decide for tested fit-for-purpose smoke control ventilators?

At the end of the day it‘s your call...........hopefully you will come to a deliberate decision.

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Austria
Belgium
Bulgaria
Croatia
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Denmark
Estonia
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Hungary
Ireland
Italy
Latvia
Lithuania
Luxembourg
Malta
Netherlands
Norway
Poland
Portugal
Romania
Russia
Slovakia
Slovenia
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Ukraine
United Kingdom

Africa
Asia
Australia
North America
South America